Posts tagged with: safety

Keep Baby’s Skin Hydrated this Summer

With all of the exciting outdoor activities the summer brings, who doesn’t want to enjoy some “fun in the sun” with their children? Unfortunately, it takes a long time for a baby’s delicate skin to fully develop, making it extremely important to keep it protected from the sun’s harmful rays. As little as ten minutes of direct sun exposure can take a toll on a baby’s sensitive skin. In addition to lathering up your little ones with SPF this summer, parents must be sure to keep their baby’s skin hydrated and nourished with essential moisturizing ingredients.

“It is extremely important to keep your baby’s skin hydrated. Unlike mature skin, a baby’s skin absorbs and loses moisture at a faster pace,” says Annette Rubin, a mother and Founder of Belli. “The hot weather and the sun add to the skin’s dehydration which is likely to create dry, chapped and irritated skin causing babies extreme pain and discomfort. The “Nourish Me” Enriched Body Lotion uses the most delicate ingredients to keep the baby’s skin hydrated and soft.”

What is Belli’s “Nourish Me” Enriched Body Lotion? “Nourish Me” Enriched Body Lotion is a pure and gentle hydrating cream which features essential ingredients for new, developing skin. The main ingredient in this product is the essential oil of chamomile which is used to soften, smooth and soothe the skin. (Retail Cost $19.00)


Booster Seat Safety

Before you jump in the car to start your summer vacation, we want parents to make sure their children are safely buckled up in the backseat. The majority of serious injuries and fatalities for children under the age of 14 occur in the summer months due to motor vehicle collisions. With only 28 per cent of children between the ages of four and eight using booster seats, parents are putting their children at risk for serious injuries in the event of a car crash. Booster seats are required in most states for children ages 4-8 and those who have not yet reached a height of 4’9″.

I know that kids, especially as they get older, don’t like to sit in a booster seat. When my kids fought sitting in the seat I just explained to them that, I loved them too much to allow them to sit without a booster seat. They understood that and when a friend would see that they still sat in a booster seat and tease them, which happened often, my kids said, “It’s because my mommy loves me. I guess your mommy doesn’t love you very much.” This “positive” peer pressure actually led to several families in our church getting booster seats for their kids.

Some tips for using a booster seat:

– A child is ready for a booster seat when they are less than four feet
nine inches tall and weigh between 40 and 80 pounds.
– A booster seat lifts a child up so that the seat belt fits correctly.
Both the lap and the shoulder belt must be used and will hold the
child and the booster seat in place during a crash or sudden stop.
– There are two different types of booster seats:
A high back booster seat provides head and neck protection in cars
without head restraints and a no back booster is used in cars that
have adjustable head restraints or high seat backs.
– A child is ready for a seat belt, in the back seat when he or she is at least four feet nine inches or 80 pounds.

Motor vehicle collisions are the leading cause of injury-related death for children. Every year, an estimated 100 children age 14 and under are killed and more than 10,000 are injured due to traffic collisions. Show your kids how much you love them. Get them a booster seat.


How Safe is Hand-Me-Down Baby Gear?

Welcoming a new member into your family is a joyous and expensive event. New moms and moms-to-be are given lots of hand-me-down baby gear to help reduce the cost of having a new baby. The March issue of “Shop Smart” magazine, from the publisher of “Consumer Reports”, takes an in-depth look at the safety issues involved in hand-me-down baby gear.  Here are some important points from the article. Know when to say “Thanks” or “No Thanks” to well meaning friends and family.

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Bath Products-

  • Safe: Used baby bathtubs are fine as long as the lining isn’t full of mold or mildew.
  • Not Safe: If the tub has an odor of either of these, say no thanks because they can be hard to remove. Also, skip secondhand bath seats, bath rings, and inflatable tubs since they have been responsible for many deaths among babies.

Car Seats:

  • Safe: A car seat that has all its original parts and labels, has never been in a crash, and fits your car and child is OK.
  • Not Safe: Products more than six years old are outdated, and most likely too run down to be considered safe.

Cribs:

  • Safe: Any crib that was manufactured after the year 2000 should be fine, as long as it is not broken or missing any pieces.
  • Not Safe: Prior to 2000, cribs were held to different safety standards, and will not be acceptable for your baby, even if you slept soundly in them. Any crib with cutouts in the headboard, and corner posts over sixteen inches pose serious risks for a child’s safety.

High Chairs:

  • Safe: Say yes to a hand-me-down high chair if it has a five-point harness to prevent your child from climbing out and a fixed crotch post that prevents him/her from sliding out the bottom.
  • Unsafe: Old fashioned wooden high chairs with removable trays or arms are considered dangerous and uncomfortable for the baby, in addition to not being up to newer product safety standards.

Strollers:

  • Safe: Strollers made after 2007 when new safety standard were published are safe.
  • Unsafe: Any stroller made prior to that date, or has missing, loose, or broken pieces is not.

Toys:

  • Safe: Stuffed animals and most children’s books make fine hand-me-downs. In the case of lead contamination in used toys, there are many home lead inspection kits which can be purchased for under twenty dollars which will tell you whether the toys are safe.
  • Unsafe: Avoid any toys that are chipped, as well as any small parts that can fit through a tube of toilet paper, since they present serious choking hazards for small children.

Used Clothing:

  • Safe: As long as buttons and snaps are on tight and none of the thread is unraveling from the fabric, the used clothing is fine.
  • Unsafe: Pass on any article of clothing with drawstrings because they pose a strangulation hazard.

You can read the entire article at ShopSmartmag.com